IC3 Movement https://www.ic3movement.com Tue, 19 May 2020 16:35:48 +0000 en hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.4.1 https://www.ic3movement.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/favicon.png IC3 Movement https://www.ic3movement.com 32 32 IC3 Student Blog – The Way of Sarthak: Boredom to Productivity https://www.ic3movement.com/uncategorized/the-way-of-sarthak/ Tue, 19 May 2020 16:33:50 +0000 https://www.ic3movement.com/?p=1278 I think I’ve been at home for a little over four weeks now, and after the first week, I started losing my mind. I consider myself a ‘hyperactive extrovert,’ and I am proud of it not going to lie. I think it serves a dual purpose; it keeps me, and the people around me entertained, and I get to increase ... Read More

The post IC3 Student Blog – The Way of Sarthak: Boredom to Productivity appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
I think I’ve been at home for a little over four weeks now, and after the first week, I started losing my mind. I consider myself a ‘hyperactive extrovert,’ and I am proud of it not going to lie. I think it serves a dual purpose; it keeps me, and the people around me entertained, and I get to increase my communication skills as well. The way I kept my cool was by taking a step back from all the panic created and solely focused on what I had to do. I thought about all the free time I had and how I could be productive with it.

I’ve been doing a lot of art in the past nine months or so, and all that I’ve learned is through experimenting, so I decided to try some online courses, which helped me quite a bit. I also had time to relax and chill with my friends and play online games where we’re able to play and talk about anything. It spreads majestic vibes; it’s unreal, and honestly, I think it’s the best part about playing.

I also joined a few communities on Discord like Lost n’ Banned to learn and understand how people around the world were dealing with so much isolation and using their time. I also looked up a few things about the college that interests me. I even attended an IC3 webinar; it was fun! I learned how to do some basic video editing tricks, how to iron my clothes, and a few recipes — so I’ve been pretty productive!

If you’re wondering how you can unleash the creative beast hidden within, it’s relatively simple; a wise man once said, “The world itself is a piece of art,” so all we need to do is observe and recreate with a few twists of our own.  

So please don’t let the quarantine take over all your thoughts and creative abilities. Stay safe and stay healthy.

Thank you for reading!

 

Sarthak Singhal 

Illustrator and Animator 

Student, DPS Ghaziabad

IC3 Local School Outreach Subcommittee Volunteer

The post IC3 Student Blog – The Way of Sarthak: Boredom to Productivity appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
Experiential Learning on a College Campus https://www.ic3movement.com/uncategorized/experiential-learning-on-a-college-campus/ Mon, 20 Apr 2020 15:05:20 +0000 https://www.ic3movement.com/?p=1261 Long before I started my journey in international education, I was an international student. When I look back, there were undoubtedly many elements of my higher education journey as an international student that helped me grow both personally and professionally to the individual I am today. From the student-centered academic philosophy of my professors who helped me out of my ... Read More

The post Experiential Learning on a College Campus appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
Long before I started my journey in international education, I was an international student. When I look back, there were undoubtedly many elements of my higher education journey as an international student that helped me grow both personally and professionally to the individual I am today. From the student-centered academic philosophy of my professors who helped me out of my shell to the opportunities, I received by getting involved on campus through student organizations and volunteer events. However, the two events that shaped my formative years in the United States most, as an international student, were my first two jobs on campus.  

Now, for most international students, when they consider pursuing higher education in the United States or any other part of the world, being able to get practical experience through internships or jobs is undoubtedly a significant attraction to choose a particular institution. Often, the hope or dream is to be able to find an opportunity to work for a Fortune 500 company in a major city in the United States overlooking downtown and telling yourself how sweet the American dream is! Unfortunately, in reality, it takes a lot more to be able to work for your company than you had hoped for, and often the journey begins working at a dining hall on your campus. 

Indeed, my first job on campus was working at a fast-food counter in the dining hall. Unlike many of my colleagues (other international graduate students) from India, I had not secured a graduate assistantship. I hence had to look for an opportunity on campus that could help pay some of my living expenses. I certainly had no experience working in a food establishment but was excited to grill my first American hamburger and deep-fry some onion rings. Now working long hours between grease and grilled meats certainly can give you the existential moments questioning the purpose of your life. Still, in so many other moments, you also learn about teamwork, humbleness, and the importance of excellent customer service. Connecting with people while sprinkling salt on fries and wrapping the freshly grilled burger in a relatively warm and greasy place is as challenging as a sales job that one could imagine doing in any profession. Of course, for a long time, I firmly believed that my role in the dining hall could never be a part of a resume or professional experience that I could share with my future employers. Thankfully, I was wrong; employers wanted to see outside of my academic performance what else I could bring to their company. And indeed, the job of working in a dining hall on campus emphasizes the very values of teamwork and building a good organization. My learning moment in that job was that no profession be it the kitchen or the boardroom, is too small or too big for an individual to perform and learn life skills that lead to other opportunities. 

My second job on campus was working for the university newspaper as a reporter, which certainly made a lot of sense with my academic degree in communications. However, it was an unpaid job, which made me question sometimes if I should be putting in those hours for a volunteer position. My dilemma of performing a volunteer activity was similar to many other international students who usually tend to seek paid positions for work on campus; however, they sometimes miss on the opportunities that come through volunteer or unpaid positions. My experience of working as a university student reporter helped me connect with many people on and off campus who I interviewed for various articles. I still remember being apprehensive about taking the position, due to my accent and lack of experience. I realized in due time that my accent did not matter, only the questions I raised. Being in a new environment in a new culture, I indeed questioned my ability to succeed more than once. I remember quite well confiding to my graduate advisor (who remains a great mentor) about my doubts about succeeding academically. It was in times like those I gave the same advice to myself that I give to my students today, and that is adaptability is the greatest strength for any international student. It is this strength we bear witness to so many CEOs of major corporations and world leaders who started as international students and now head those organizations and countries. 

Reflecting on those two experiences from my journey as an international student, I certainly value the life skills and opportunities that came along through my two campus jobs. The life of an international student certainly comes with many challenges and struggles. Still,  I always encourage my international students to never say never to a volunteer opportunity or a job that may lead to building connections with time and perseverance. 

The post Experiential Learning on a College Campus appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
Thoughts on Co-operative Education and How to Approach it https://www.ic3movement.com/uncategorized/thoughts-on-co-operative-education-and-how-to-approach-it/ Tue, 07 Apr 2020 13:52:08 +0000 https://www.ic3movement.com/?p=1236 Co-operative education programs (Co-op for short) are opportunities offered by most universities and can be similar to an internship. These Co-op placements are usually paid and an excellent chance for students to gain professional experience, earn a paycheck and start to network. But there is more to Co-op than merely making money and boosting your career opportunities after completing your ... Read More

The post Thoughts on Co-operative Education and How to Approach it appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
Co-operative education programs (Co-op for short) are opportunities offered by most universities and can be similar to an internship. These Co-op placements are usually paid and an excellent chance for students to gain professional experience, earn a paycheck and start to network. But there is more to Co-op than merely making money and boosting your career opportunities after completing your university degree. This is a time of exploration – it is time to understand what it means to work as an accountant or to understand the different sub-cultures of the IT industry! Or maybe you know exactly what profession you want to go into and want to know more about the difference between working for SAP, 3M, Flour, or Siemens. Co-op is about understanding what type of industry or career you’re interested in, how to transition and grow towards your dream job.

Most universities have Co-op programs and career counseling offices and will design their programs differently. The various Co-op structures offer students distinct opportunities. Is it better to work for one company for 12 months or three companies for four months each? It is never too early to ask questions about the Co-op programs, their structure, and how they can benefit you. Here are some sample questions you can ask: 

  • Does the university have a Co-op program? If not, how does it support your transition into a professional career after graduation? Maybe it has a different name, or the university has different ways of helping you. 
  • Does the university have a Co-op program for the faculty of your interest? Some universities will have Co-op for all faculties, and some will limit it for business or engineering. 
  • How is the Co-op program designed? Will it be one Co-op opportunity for 12 months or many shorter opportunities? Is Co-op offered every year or just in the third year? 
  • How are Co-op opportunities awarded? Is it through the interview process, does previous experience matter, does your GPA affect your chances? How will the university help you gain experience before applying for your first Co-op? 
  • Is a Co-op placement or opportunity guaranteed? Is it a program requirement that all students must complete? 
  • Does the university have opportunities outside its location? Some students will use Co-op to travel or gain experience in a different country. 
  • What organizations, companies, and governments usually take on Co-op students from the university of your interest? 
  • If the salary is important to you – ask about it.  

Remember that Co-op is as much about boosting your career as it is about understanding your career options. It is essential to start this journey with a good plan and a flexible mindset. Having worked with Co-op students, I have three final pieces of advice: 

  • Always ask questions – your university and your Co-op employer are also there to support and mentor you. We also want you to be successful! 
  • Think about what your priorities for Co-op (experience, international exposure, understanding industry, and organization culture, etc.) and keep that in mind when looking at opportunities. The biggest brands might not offer opportunities that match your goals.  
  • While on your Co-op – work hard and volunteer for projects and tasks outside your job description, and have fun! 

There is more information about Co-ops, internships, and how to make the most of your opportunities below: 

The post Thoughts on Co-operative Education and How to Approach it appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
Money Matters https://www.ic3movement.com/uncategorized/money-matters/ Wed, 01 Apr 2020 14:37:05 +0000 https://www.ic3movement.com/?p=1230 Going to university or college will be a significant investment. For some students, this will be the first time they are handling their financial responsibilities. We want to make sure students are successful in meeting the financial demands of their post-secondary education, and the first step is to investigate your options and to do your research on what scholarships are ... Read More

The post Money Matters appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
Going to university or college will be a significant investment. For some students, this will be the first time they are handling their financial responsibilities. We want to make sure students are successful in meeting the financial demands of their post-secondary education, and the first step is to investigate your options and to do your research on what scholarships are available. This blog will provide a brief overview of the different types of funding available and some handy pointers on the application process.

Funding can come in different formats including, merit or need-based scholarships, athletic scholarships, grants, loans, bursaries, government assistance, non-profit organizations, and more.

Here are some tips and resources to provide your students when considering looking at financing options:

  • Consider the overall costs of education. This includes tuition, books, accommodation, food, and personal expenses. Having realistic expectations can lead to better preparation and budget planning
  • Inquire directly with the institution on what scholarships they have available. Every institution is unique and may offer various types of funding, including entrance scholarships and scholarships for current students
  • Check for eligibility requirements, and most importantly, application deadlines! Scholarship deadlines can vary from institution to institution. My best advice is to investigate scholarship opportunities at the beginning of the school cycle for your institution of interest
  • Apply for as many scholarships as you can. The biggest misconception from students is that they’re too competitive or unattainable 
  • Looking at academics is only one part of the story. Some applications will ask you to highlight your interests and leadership skills. Whether that’s organizing your school donation drive, to creating your own YouTube channel, be authentic in what makes YOU unique 
  • Have strong references!  Seek out people that can speak to your experiences and skills; this could be your school principal, teacher, guidance counselor, and/or employer
  • Read and stick to the guidelines. Whether its word or page count, examples or style font – not following the rules may lead to disqualification
  • Proofread. A strong application is thought out and written carefully. Spelling errors and bad grammar can be one determining factor in why a student may not receive a scholarship
  • Explore what your home country government and host school government has to offer
  • Submit early!!!  
  • Admitted students can further bring down their finances by working on campus, enrolling in co-operative education, and seeking out internship opportunities, many of which are paid positions

As educators, we want to ensure that students are well supported and to make education as accessible as possible. Scholarships are a great way to not only gain financial freedom but also to have student’s efforts recognized, as well (bonus) finesse their reading, writing, and interviewing skills! 

Below you will find some helpful resources to assist in this process. 

No matter the outcome, trust that when nothing is certain, anything is possible, and there are many opportunities for those who seek it. Ultimately the focus is on student success and delivering our promise on the exciting experience that university and colleges have to offer. 


Sources

  1. Study in Canada Scholarships: https://www.educanada.ca/scholarships-bourses/can/institutions/study-in-canada-etudes-au-canada.aspx?lang=eng and https://www.scholarshipscanada.com/ 
  2. IECA Global Committee Merit Scholarship Resource: https://tinyurl.com/IECA-GC-IntlScholarships
  3. Study in Germanyhttps://www.study-in-germany.de/en/
  4. Study in Lativahttp://www.studyinlatvia.lv/tuition_fees
  5. Study in Hungry Scholarships: http://studyinhungary.hu/study-in-hungary/menu/studying-in-hungary/tuition-fees-and-funding-options.html

The post Money Matters appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
Reflections on Growth https://www.ic3movement.com/uncategorized/reflections-on-growth/ Thu, 26 Mar 2020 13:44:59 +0000 https://www.ic3movement.com/?p=1224 “Could a simpler way of life really be possible?” As I write these words, my local area is in social isolation, much like the rest of the world, to curb the spread of COVID-19.  Schools are closed, along with most businesses. Events and family gatherings, weddings, and even funerals, are postponed or cancelled altogether. We are forced to stay put. ... Read More

The post Reflections on Growth appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
“Could a simpler way of life really be possible?”

As I write these words, my local area is in social isolation, much like the rest of the world, to curb the spread of COVID-19. 

Schools are closed, along with most businesses. Events and family gatherings, weddings, and even funerals, are postponed or cancelled altogether. We are forced to stay put. To slow down. 

And while much of the conversation globally has surrounded grave concerns about stunted growth in an economic sense, I have been pondering what positive, and unexpected consequences might result from our current predicament.

“The Modern World is obsessed with growth. We worship growth. Growth is our religion.” — Mansoor Khan1

At the first Annual IC3 Conference, held in Mumbai in 2016, well known Indian film director and producer Mansoor Khan spoke about humanity’s unwavering, and perhaps recalcitrant, commitment to growth. Khan commented on what he recognized as a misguided expectation that continuous, exponential economic growth was both desirable and feasible. His discussion of growth centered on the role of energy and, in particular, on the irreconcilable dissonance between the exponential growth expectation about which he spoke and the finite reserve of natural resources. Khan concluded very directly that sustaining current growth rates was impossible, even in scenarios where innovations in alternative energy production take center stage.

Khan’s conclusion is certainly not a universally accepted one. For example, historian and author Yuval Noah Harari maintained that energy potential is unlimited, citing the historical track record of human ingenuity, innovation as well as the technology curve2. 

Regardless of one’s position on the current state of natural resources and its relation to tomorrow’s energy supply, what is clear is that we have grown – materially, and in terms of consumption. Here is some food for thought:

  • World population currently stands at an estimated 7.8 billion, an increase of 7.1 billion since the year 1700. Two billion people are overweight or obese, a far cry from the reality for most people throughout human history3. Though the annual growth rate will slow between 2020 and 2050, global population is expected to approach 10 billion during this period4
  • In 2020, 726 million motor vehicles will be in use in OECD countries alone, up from 530 million in 2002. The overwhelming majority of these vehicles are for personal use5.
  • As a snapshot, in 2015, nearly 36% of all new plastic was produced specifically for packaging consumer goods6, presumably motivated by a large appetite for single-use items. Packaging is, by far, the largest category in plastic production7.

Some argue that we are addicted to material excess. We are rarely satisfied with what we have. We want more stuff, and we want it cheaper. While these are certainly not universal conditions, the global economy is largely built on the demand for more. Though, without question, growth is not exclusive to the economy. 

This brings me to the concept of the growth mindset.

“Happiness is neither virtue nor pleasure nor this thing nor that but simply growth. We are happy when we are growing.” — W.B. Yeats

One of the ways we as educators and leaders can positively impact our youth is to instill a growth mindset. To be clear, a growth mindset has nothing to do with growing GDP or other material or economic developments. A growth mindset is actually about an individual’s perception of their ability to learn and their brain’s capacity to develop, as opposed to a belief that their intelligence is static and that they have no power to feed it.     

Here is a perspective from the OECD’s Programme for International Student Assessment, also known as PISA. PISA gauges the ability of 15-year-olds’ to apply acquired knowledge from key subject areas (namely reading, mathematics and science) in their everyday lives.

“[S]tudents with a growth mindset reported greater motivation to master tasks and self-efficacy, set more ambitious learning goals for themselves, attached greater importance to school, and were more likely to expect to complete a university degree. There are various ways a growth mindset can be instilled in students. It can begin by teaching students more about the brain’s capacity to learn through reading, class discussions and other activities. Research has shown that students who are exposed to these school-based interventions tend to show stronger beliefs about the brain’s capacity to change8.”

Instilling a growth mindset is not the sole responsibility of counselors and teachers, however. The report also indicates that outcomes associated with a growth mindset are significantly impacted by the system itself, and by its policymakers. In other words, counselors and teachers need to be appropriately supported with the time and resources it takes to achieve these goals.

Regardless of whether framed in economic or intellectual terms, there is enormous power in growth. Growth is dynamic. It can be both creative and destructive.

And while arguments over resources generally dominate discussions of growth in almost every context, it is rare to observe any mention of what I believe to be one of the most valuable resources in the human experience. Time.

Assuming one’s basic needs are met, is there anything more important than how we spend our time? Unlike many other resources, time is gone forever once it is spent. It can never be recovered. You cannot earn more, or buy more. Time does not regenerate. We won’t find a treasure trove of time through ocean drilling or by mining asteroids. All of this is to say that without some extraordinary and unexpected developments in quantum physics, we can’t get it back. Time is truly precious.

So, again I ask: “Could a simpler way of life really be possible?”

There is no shortage of stress brought on by the coronavirus pandemic, including legitimate concerns about employment status, the potential or actual loss of income, and physical and mental health of oneself and family, above all else.

Though, amidst the panic and uncertainty in our current global predicament, I’ve also observed a slow-down in the general pace of life (at least for many, and unfortunately and notably not for first-responders, medical professionals and other essential personnel). But, for those without essential duties and with daily commutes considerably shortened or altogether done away with, there seems to be more time for simple pleasures. Simple pleasures like a modest breakfast or dinner at home with immediate family; quiet time for reflection, reading or personal research; calmer roads, with seemingly cleaner air; an unusually long or leisurely walk or bike ride (of course depending upon available outdoor space and local restrictions). 

I’ve also observed generosity, compassion, empathy, and resilience. Many charity organizations are benefiting from an outpouring of support and civic engagement from their local communities. It seems a time capsule has been unlocked.

Are we experiencing something that could fundamentally change how we live our lives – how we interact with each other, how we work, and how we study?

If so, could this experience also change how we grow, or perhaps how we arrange our growth priorities?

How will we, both collectively and individually, prioritize our limited resources into growth after this? Will we focus on adding to our collection of stuff? Will we increase the quality of our limited time? Will we expand our minds? Our spirits? Our hearts?

I suppose time will tell.


1 Khan, M. (2013) The third curve: The end of growth as we know it. Mansoor Khan.
2 Harari, Y. N. (2015). Sapiens: A brief history of humankind.
3 
United Nations. Goal 12: Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns. Sustainable development goals. https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-consumption-production/
4 Chamie, J. (2020, February 11). YaleGlobal Online. World population: 2020 overview. https://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/world-population-2020-overview
5 
United Nations. Goal 12: Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns. Sustainable development goals. https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-consumption-production/
6 Geyer, J., Jambeck, J. R., & Law K. L. (2017). Production, use, and fate of all plastics ever made. Science Advances, 3(7). https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/3/7/e1700782
7 Beckman, E. (2018, August 13). World   Economic Forum. The world’s plastic problem in numbers. https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2018/08/the-world-of-plastics-in-numbers
8 Schleicher, A. (2018). PISA 2018: insights and interpretations. Organization for economic cooperation and development (2018). https://www.oecd.org/pisa/PISA%202018%20Insights%20and%20Interpretations%20FINAL%20PDF.pdf

The post Reflections on Growth appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
Why Attend an IC3 Regional Forum? https://www.ic3movement.com/uncategorized/why-attend-an-ic3-regional-forum/ Tue, 11 Feb 2020 13:57:30 +0000 https://www.ic3movement.com/?p=1169 Maybe you’ve heard of the IC3 Regional Forums, but you feel overwhelmed by everything that’s involved. Don’t worry! Below, we’ve shared some pointers from Vatsal Chandra, a university representative from the University of Essex, and Hemaalathaa Yuvaraj, a high school delegate from Pathways School Gurgaon. After reading their tips, you’ll be able to make the most out of every IC3 ... Read More

The post Why Attend an IC3 Regional Forum? appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
Maybe you’ve heard of the IC3 Regional Forums, but you feel overwhelmed by everything that’s involved. Don’t worry! Below, we’ve shared some pointers from Vatsal Chandra, a university representative from the University of Essex, and Hemaalathaa Yuvaraj, a high school delegate from Pathways School Gurgaon. After reading their tips, you’ll be able to make the most out of every IC3 Regional Forum you attend!

Tips for University Representatives at the IC3 Regional Forums

Select your Targets

  • It is essential not to stretch yourself. A university representative is continuously on the move, and there is a risk of fatigue setting in. For the IC3 Regional Forums, plan your calendar. Look at the IC3 Regional Forum schedule and chose the schools you want to visit. These can be existing markets, or a plan to explore new markets, make the decision keeping in mind your university’s goal.

Plan other visits around them

  • The IC3 Regional Forums are an excellent platform for you to connect with the counselors of a region, spend more time, and build connections at the grassroots. Usually starting in January, going on until May, combine IC3 Regional Forums with other marketing or recruitment visits. This way, you cover a larger territory in a shorter stay and don’t have to plan a separate visit.

Visit other schools

  • One school hosts each IC3 Regional Forum, but that doesn’t mean you cannot visit other schools. It is a wonderful opportunity to connect with the counselors of other schools, send out an email, and visit them before or after the day of the forum.

Host a Session

  • There is nothing better than being a panelist for a session or hosting one individually at the forum. It is a stage that allows you to inform, educate, and train counselors and colleagues. You may hold an informative session on studying in your country, to in-depth training on the application process and scholarships. Also, it helps you learn about other universities and expand your knowledge.

Relax!

  • The last and most critical step is to relax. By being a part of an IC3 Regional Forum, you become a member of the IC3 family automatically. This family has members globally, and every person present at the IC3 Regional Forums is there to learn, unlearn, and learn again.

So make the most of the IC3 Regional Forums and help spread quality education across the world.

-Vatsal Chandra Regional Officer, University of Essex, England

Tips for High School Representatives at the IC3 Regional Forums

Network

  • Network with university representatives from around the globe, establish connections with university representatives and look for opportunities to utilize them as a resource for your school. Try to conduct a session for students, parents, or facilitators with a university representative or faculty member from the respective university.  

Connect

  • Connect with seasoned high school counselors from in and around the community. This assists in building collaborative activities between schools or groups of schools by organizing joint sessions, workshops, or fairs, which then benefit the broader community. In the long run, this helps in building an active network of counselors who can prosper from each other’s learning and sharing. This also provides opportunities for new counselors to uncover tools and materials to use at their school. 

Attend Sessions 

  • Attend sessions by distinguished speakers. It takes a lot of planning and effort to bring esteemed leaders from universities and high schools. Please take full advantage and be sure to attend their sessions, which will help you in understanding the changing landscape of tertiary education around the globe. These sessions also guide you in discovering trends, innovations, technologies, and effective practices available in this profession.  

Attending an IC3 Regional Forum provides individuals with a unique opportunity to connect, learn, and globalize education. We hope to see you at one soon!

Hemaalathaa Yuvaraj, Assistant College Advisor, Pathways School Gurgaon 

P.S. Learn more about the IC3 Movement and IC3 Regional Forums, by attending the upcoming webinar on 12 February, Highlighting the 2020 IC3 Regional Forums – Who, What, When, Where and Why? Register HERE.

The post Why Attend an IC3 Regional Forum? appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
Season’s Greetings from IC3! https://www.ic3movement.com/uncategorized/seasons-greetings-from-ic3/ Mon, 06 Jan 2020 20:50:12 +0000 https://www.ic3movement.com/?p=1079 “This can be a very lonely job.” A statement often associated with the life of a counselor or a university representative. Even though you may be surrounded by students or traveling extensively to meet students, it typically ends up being a one-person role. This is when a community of counselors and representatives plays a significant role in redefining the word ... Read More

The post Season’s Greetings from IC3! appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
“This can be a very lonely job.” A statement often associated with the life of a counselor or a university representative. Even though you may be surrounded by students or traveling extensively to meet students, it typically ends up being a one-person role. This is when a community of counselors and representatives plays a significant role in redefining the word “family.”

As you keep reading, you’ll see the journey and personal insight of our colleagues for their holiday season plans and how they’re spending the last week of 2019 as we all approach a new decade. We hope you enjoy and even gain some new insights along the way!

“Some time ago, I had a memorable conversation with an admissions officer who mentioned that she needs to stop teaching, as she had been in that profession since 1982. We agreed on one thing: It is a never-ending process. We learn and we teach. That’s what I strive for and have grown to love. This is probably a lesson I learned from international conferences, especially IC3, which has given me the opportunity to meet people from around the world. Because I am able to share these experiences, and come to a realization that all the time I dedicated to counseling my students, I tried to make it a fun journey and I have learned along with them. These holidays, I look forward to spending quality time thinking of ways for improvement and cherish all the moments that come along with it.”
– Thowhed Hussain, Scholastica Senior Campus Uttara 

“It’s not only the last month of the year, it’s the last month of the decade.

As I reach my ninth year working, I look back on 2019 with pride and gratitude. But what I’ve learned most of all over the years, is that perspective is what’s key. 

This year was faced with challenges and joy on all personal, professional and physical levels. But looking through the lens of the last decade, this has made me realize how much I have done, how much I have changed, how much I have accomplished, and how much more I want to do. Professionally this decade I have been fortunate to have traveled to over 25 countries, taken on leadership opportunities, be part of a dynamic higher education community, and welcomed to a family (the IC3 family) that fosters change, and betterment for the world of college counseling. But there have also been sacrifices; loss, weeks away from home, loneliness, missed life events and more. We each have our stories, and it is up to us on how we want to create that narrative. With all that has been said and done, the most I am I’m looking forward to this holiday season is pausing and living in the moment,  to spend time with family and loved ones and reflect on everything that I am grateful for in my life. My challenge for you is rather than looking back on the last year, to reflect back on the last ten, and hope that you leave feeling proud of all that you have achieved. With 2020 upon us, my wish for you is that it’s not only the best year to come, but the best decade to be the greatest version of yourself.”
Alisha Koumphol, Ryerson University, Canada

“Seasons greetings to my IC3 friends! Like many people, this time of year is about family and stopping to appreciate those around us. This year we’ll be in North Carolina with our three kids, doing what we enjoy most when we’re together:  eat, drink and be merry! Additionally, as much as I want to disconnect from social media, I also enjoy “spending time” with my international family, celebrating with them as well as supporting them as I know this time of year is not easy for everybody.  I am grateful for the kindness of others in my life, more than ever, and vow to pay it forward in 2020. Wishing you all the best in the new year!”
Bridget Herrera, American International School of Dhaka

The family of counselors and representatives of IC3 wish you all a wonderful holiday season and entry into a new decade. Take this time to relax, do what brings you joy, and reflect on how all of us can be part of every student’s dream! 

Let’s go, 2020! We’re ready for you!

The post Season’s Greetings from IC3! appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
#StudentExcellence: Priya Rajbhandary https://www.ic3movement.com/uncategorized/studentexcellence-priya-rajbhandary/ https://www.ic3movement.com/uncategorized/studentexcellence-priya-rajbhandary/#respond Mon, 06 May 2019 16:36:10 +0000 https://www.ic3movement.com/?p=850 IC3 is excited to highlight Priya Rajbhandary next for the #StudentExcellence project! Priya is in her first year of the International Baccalaureate® (IB) Diploma Program (DP) and comes to us from Ullens School in Kathmandu, Nepal. The Ullens School is a non-profit school situated in Khumaltar, Lalitpur, Nepal. Established in 2006, it offers classes from kindergarten to grade 10 and ... Read More

The post #StudentExcellence: Priya Rajbhandary appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
IC3 is excited to highlight Priya Rajbhandary next for the #StudentExcellence project! Priya is in her first year of the International Baccalaureate® (IB) Diploma Program (DP) and comes to us from Ullens School in Kathmandu, Nepal. The Ullens School is a non-profit school situated in Khumaltar, Lalitpur, Nepal. Established in 2006, it offers classes from kindergarten to grade 10 and is the only educational institution in Nepal that offers the IBDP.

The IC3 Regional Forum was hosted at Ullens School on 26 January 2019 and Priya was nominated by their head academic counselor! Enjoy reading and watching Priya’s video so you can get to know her and what her plans are for the future.

Priya Rajbhandary

IC3: What are some current projects (and clubs) you’re working on in school?

Priya: I am a part of Kura Kaani, a talk show organized by the students of Ullens School where speakers are invited to share their stories and experiences. I am also a part of the Journalism Club. Additionally, a group of friends and I founded a club to archive memories and report activities around school.

IC3: What do you like to do in your free time away from school?

Priya: I’m usually painting and reading during my free time, and I like spending time with my friends and family as well.

IC3: What are you interested in studying once you finish high school?

Priya: I do have a diverse set of interests from reading to writing, and I would probably want to delve into Journalism, Political Science, as well as Gender Studies. But, I do want to keep my options open and I feel like going to a liberal arts college in the U.S. will allow me to do so.

The post #StudentExcellence: Priya Rajbhandary appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
https://www.ic3movement.com/uncategorized/studentexcellence-priya-rajbhandary/feed/ 0
The Road to IC3: I Delayed the Inevitable https://www.ic3movement.com/uncategorized/the-road-to-ic3-i-delayed-the-inevitable/ https://www.ic3movement.com/uncategorized/the-road-to-ic3-i-delayed-the-inevitable/#respond Mon, 08 Apr 2019 22:55:23 +0000 https://www.ic3movement.com/?p=823 After the high-octane sessions at the IC3 Regional Forum in Bengaluru, here I am, a couple of days later recounting all the memories before I took the road to IC3. Back in 2014, every time I walked in to my Physics class, I looked at those eager faces, turned to solve an equation on the board and asked myself, “how ... Read More

The post The Road to IC3: I Delayed the Inevitable appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
After the high-octane sessions at the IC3 Regional Forum in Bengaluru, here I am, a couple of days later recounting all the memories before I took the road to IC3.

Back in 2014, every time I walked in to my Physics class, I looked at those eager faces, turned to solve an equation on the board and asked myself, “how many of them would want to study physics later in life?” or “am I guiding them right?” or “what if that boy doesn’t even know what he wants to do?” or “am I thrusting Physics on them?” or “what else can I do?” or “can I teach them how to choose what they want to learn?”

I had countless questions. It was 2016 – the year IC3 was instituted and the same year I realized I was delaying the inevitable. I was asked to lead the college counseling department in my school. With myriad feelings inside every day, I was far from conquering the world outside. I feared rejection; I feared failure – just like any other student waiting to write an important test of life. 

I came with no set qualifications or degrees to back me up. All I knew was that the world is changing and it was about time that we educators paved the way for better career choices. It took sleepless nights making notes, visiting every college website I knew, subscribing to newsletters, writing emails to universities and much more. My questions went exponential and the void of unawareness left me despaired at times.

Two months into 2016, I was still navigating through the yellow pages of colleges during free hours, reading career magazines during lunch and every bit of new information left me more overwhelmed than ever. One morning I received an email from the IC3 team, followed by a phone call, inviting me to the first conference. I delayed the inevitable again. I gave the conference a pass.

In a tiny room with less than 20 students, I thought that was my universe until IC3 gave me a second chance. This time I made it. Even at this point in time, I had no idea what IC3 entailed. It unfolded to be the answer for every question of mine that had left me a tad shattered earlier. Each session brought me closer to my goals. Every peer I met shared a common mission. It was the much-needed pilgrimage to hone my career counseling skills.

I had never attended a gathering of this scale in my entire lifetime. It was amazing to witness the drive, passion and motivation to make a difference in the student’s lives. The connections I made are life-long; the ideas we exchange today are insightful. I am equipped to combat redundancy. From destination IC3, I restarted my journey in college counseling.

For more information on the Annual IC3 Conference, please visit www.ic3conference.com.

The post The Road to IC3: I Delayed the Inevitable appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
https://www.ic3movement.com/uncategorized/the-road-to-ic3-i-delayed-the-inevitable/feed/ 0
#StudentExcellence: Soumya Swain https://www.ic3movement.com/uncategorized/studentexcellence-soumya-swain/ https://www.ic3movement.com/uncategorized/studentexcellence-soumya-swain/#respond Thu, 04 Apr 2019 11:23:45 +0000 https://www.ic3movement.com/?p=829 Soumya Swain is whom we are highlighting next for the #StudentExcellence project! Soumya is in grade 12 and comes to us from The Sanskaar Valley School in Bhopal, India. The IC3 Regional Forum was hosted there on 17 January 2019 and Soumya was nominated by her school! Please enjoy reading and getting to know more about the amazing Soumya! IC3: ... Read More

The post #StudentExcellence: Soumya Swain appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
Soumya Swain is whom we are highlighting next for the #StudentExcellence project! Soumya is in grade 12 and comes to us from The Sanskaar Valley School in Bhopal, India. The IC3 Regional Forum was hosted there on 17 January 2019 and Soumya was nominated by her school!

Please enjoy reading and getting to know more about the amazing Soumya!

Soumya Swain

IC3: Soumya, what are some current projects you’re working on in school?

Soumya: I started “The Ripple Effect” project in 2015 in my capacity as the Microsoft Student Ambassador of the school. The program itself was aimed at enabling students to create bilingual digital content tailored to the needs of underprivileged students. My team and I focused on training a group of nearly 40 students in various game-making, app development, and presentation making software. We created engaging and enriching digital content as per teacher specifications that were then provided to and used by Sanskaar Vidhya Niketan, a tertiary school which provides free education to underprivileged girls.

I presented this model of digitization of education at the MeltingPot2020 Summit,  where we were awarded the Young Innovator Award in the School Section. I was also invited as a Presenter to the TECH2018 Conference organized by UNESCO MGIEP in association with the Andhra Pradesh Government.

Additionally, I was the founder of a social service group named “Jijivisha,” which means, “the desire to live.” I led a group of volunteers in activities related to women’s health and child welfare. We organized sanitation drives in the city and collected and donated sanitary napkins to underprivileged women living in difficult areas. We also organized a six-week long summer education camp for the children in that area. We were activists for LGBTQ+ rights and participated in the Bhopal Pride Parade. We worked to increase awareness towards issues facing the community through awareness drives, presentations, rallies, campaigning, posters, writing, and artwork we put up in school.

IC3: Are you a part of any clubs in school?

Soumya: I am part of the Publications Group in school and work on writing articles, school reports, and creating artwork. I was previously an active part of the school’s social service club and I am an avid debater as well.

IC3: What are you interested in studying once you finish high school?

Soumya: I wish to pursue political science as a subject because it has always interested me and I’ve enjoyed it throughout school. However, what drives me to want to pursue it, is the major impact political science has on the affairs of the world. Every country and its people are subject to the whims of political leaders and the rules of political systems. Any and all world issues are results of politics and can be solved through astute political decisions. Thus, political science is my avenue of choice to fix issues that plague our species.

IC3: In what country are you interested in going to college?

Soumya: There is no particular preference. I have mostly applied to colleges that have a reputable program for political science, and faculty whose work I have read and appreciated.

IC3: What do you like to do in your free time away from school?

Soumya: I enjoy reading, in particular, classical works of fiction. I also enjoy sketching and art.

IC3: What topic or career industry interests you the most?

Soumya: I am interested in the field of education. It is my ambition to ensure that all people have access to free and quality college or vocational education. I would like to become a professor one day. I also see myself actively involved in community service!

The post #StudentExcellence: Soumya Swain appeared first on IC3 Movement.

]]>
https://www.ic3movement.com/uncategorized/studentexcellence-soumya-swain/feed/ 0